Her Last Breath, J. A. Schneider

Her Last Breath, J. A. Schneider

Her Last Breath: Detective Kerri Blasco Book 2

Waking up with amnesia next to a dead body is enough to panic anyone. For Mari Gill, suffering from extreme asthma, the shock was nearly enough to kill her too. Injured, arrested, and unable to remember a single thing about the previous night, Mari turns to her ex-husband, a prominent defence lawyer, for help, but her case doesn’t look great. With only one NYPD detective willing to look deeper into the facts of the case, Mari’s just lucky that that one detective is Kerri Blasco: intuitive, driven, and with a reputation for cracking the uncrackable when it comes to cases.

Her Last Breath is another twisty, intelligent mystery thriller from author J. A. Schneider, where the evidence coils and turns like an eel on a hook, and the author’s decision to keep the story’s point of view tight on Mari keeps the reader guessing all the way. Mari goes from trauma to paranoia and back again, her instincts pushing her towards uncovering the blocked memories that could make or break the case, even as she doubts her senses, her memory, and who she can trust. It’s a rare pleasure to come across a mystery that doesn’t give itself away in the first few chapters, and J. A. Schneider’s books have a consistent winning streak on that score. I highly recommend this author – her plots go from strength to strength.

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Trojan: Hollow Moon of Jupiter, Brian Dingle

Trojan: Hollow Moon of Jupiter, Brian Dingle

Trojan: Hollow Moon of Jupiter (Trojan Series Book 1)

Trojan: Hollow Moon of Jupiter follows chronologically from Trojan: Nefra Contact. Humanity has colonised Trojan to ensure that the Nefra can never use it as a beach head to invade Earth. Despite the social unease, and the myriad incorrect theories flying about the Nefra, there are a number of Nefra living among the colonists, mostly working in the armed forces and law enforcement. However, something is mysteriously killing street people, a fact that doesn’t attract much attention until one of the victims doesn’t end up dead – and turns out to be the brother of one of Trojan’s most notorious crime bosses.

Brian Dingle’s characters form the strong point of this book, from the seminarian-turned-crook to the sunny-natured Nefra policewoman who helps to break the string of murders, and the world-building is detailed and convincing. The main points of philosophy are told, rather than shown, which is a shame as they’re good points, but the overall story will gain the reader’s sympathy despite that, with good action scenes and dialogue. The science behind Trojan is also refreshingly well integrated into the plot, placing the story firmly as a science-fiction crime thriller, rather than a crime thriller where the characters happen to have spaceships rather than taxis. I’d definitely recommend this to anyone who enjoys sci-fi.