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Circuit Trilogy, Rhett C Bruno

Circuit Trilogy, Rhett C Bruno

The Complete Circuit Trilogy (Omnibus Edition)

Executor Rising
Progeny of Vale
Earthfall

Talon Rayne, ex-enforcer to one of the overlords of the Ceresian clans, is dying. The element that provides gravity to the stations and asteroids that house humanity in the solar system is lethal on direct exposure, and his days are numbered. Isolated as he is from his previous position, the rumours are still disturbing; freighters going missing, and the Tribunal, fervent worshippers of the spirit of Earth, are stepping up their enforcement among the scattered settlements that humanity calls home. When Talon’s previous masters call on him for one last mission, Talon has no idea what he’s about to stumble into…

The Circuit Trilogy is an epic science-fiction adventure from author Rhett C Bruno, set in a future where unrestricted resource exploitation has left Earth itself uninhabitable, and the human population is spread through the solar system in a web of stations, moons, and asteroids. With an eclectic group of protagonists, including ex-Tribune Cassius Vale, a dying Ceresian, and  a very current, increasingly disaffected Tribunal Enforcer, the conflicts of personality and ideology run deep. In some cases, I felt that the characters could have been developed more early on; any hints concerning why Sage Volus acts as she does aren’t forthcoming for some time, which made her more difficult to relate to early in the story. Equally, while the reader becomes increasingly aware of the depth of the world-building as the trilogy progresses, it isn’t very apparent in the earlier stages of the story, and frankly I feel it deserves the mention. However, with a storyline rife with politics and plots, and the stakes nothing less than Earth itself, this trilogy is an enjoyable read.

Suzy Spitfire Kills Everybody, Joe Canzano

Suzy Spitfire Kills Everybody, Joe Canzano

Suzy Spitfire Kills Everybody

Suzy Castillo, better known as Suzy Spitfire, doesn’t have a lot of friends since she killed her uncle and ran away from her family and her father’s legacy. Aiko is one of them, so when he invites her to meet him in a seedy bar, she shows up with her guns on. Unfortunately, their meeting isn’t quite as quiet as they’d hoped; Suzy’s father left something behind that everyone wants, from government agencies down to the local gangs, and they’re willing to kill for it.

Suzy Spitfire Kills Everybody is a sci-fi adventure painted with a rich palette of AI, space fights, high-powered spaceships, and crooked cops. The story is fast-paced, and the twists and turns make for an enjoyable read as Suzy and her squad try to make their way across the inner solar system to retrieve their prize. I did find that there were elements of the story that stretched my ability to suspend my disbelief, not least the appearance of the Shakespeare troupe. On the other hand, the technical aspects of the writing were solid, and the read, given the plot elements, was surprisingly light-hearted overall. If you like your sci-fi with undertones of ‘Fast and Furious’, you’ll enjoy this book.

Ghosts of Innocence, Ian S. Bott

Ghosts of Innocence, Ian S. Bott

Ghosts of Innocence

In Ghosts of Innocence, Ian S. Bott brings us aboard Imperial starhopper Chantry Bay, inbound to the Imperial seat of government, moments before its unscheduled, flaming entry into planetary atmosphere draws all eyes away from the covert insertion through the defenses of Shayla Carver, an assassin aimed at the best-protected target of all: Emperor Julian Flavio Skamensis. Sent off-course with a damaged suit, Shayla has an unenviable slog through jungle, under the watchful eyes of a security force on full alert, to reach her rendezvous with the local Insurrection and hit the fast-closing time-window that offers her only hope of infiltrating the Emperor’s heavily fortressed compound.

Ghosts of Innocence opens with a deadly starship crash, and the heavy menace of Imperial security hemming the storyline on all sides. The world-building is detailed and intricate, with fascinating threads drawn from many cultures to draw you in. The tension is a constant through the book, expertly evoked by small touches in every scene, and spiked by Shayla’s flashbacks and gut-wrenching nightmares. Ian S. Bott has done a great job of creating a character who is impossible not to relate to, and whose self-doubt will strike resonances in everyone. Shayla makes a strong protagonist, and even if her streak of luck seems incredible at times, you’ll forget it at the next page and the next challenge.

From Ice to Ashes, Rhett C Bruno

From Ice to Ashes, Rhett C Bruno

From Ice to Ashes

Kale Drayton is a Ringer, a descendant of the settlers from the earliest ship to escape the Meteorite, which sought refuge further out in the Solar System than any ship before it. However, since then Earthers have reached Saturn, bringing with them all the brute force of those accustomed to full gravity—and a barrage of diseases. The Ringers have been decimated and driven to near-exile in their own settlements as a consequence. When Kale finds out that his own mother has fallen sick and is imprisoned in the Earther-run quarantine area, he abandons everything to try and save her—and in the process, uncovers a history and a future he’d never imagined.

From Ice to Ashes is a powerful story of oppression and discrimination, expertly painted in the colours of a science-fiction future set among the moons of Saturn. Rhett Bruno’s society of Ringers comes out of the pages with real life, created in compelling detail and supported by well-thought-out world building. If at times the antagonists are a little too universally and perfectly reprehensible, the Earther corporations’ corruption and favouritism draw on universally-understood issues to evoke strong sympathy for their overmatched adversaries, the Ringers. This was an excellent read, certainly worth recommending to anyone who enjoys a story guaranteed to draw a reader in and make them think.

A Cup of Pending, Jonah Gibson

A Cup of Pending, Jonah Gibson

A Cup of Pending

Sometimes a life can turn on the least expected actions. When successful investor (and criminal) Oliver Crews tripped the homeless man in front of him in the coffee queue, he wasn’t expecting anything more than some petty revenge for the delay. Unfortunately for Oliver, his briefcase was the last stop for Tommy and his friend Cliff, and they hatched their own revenge—to the tune of $45 million in laundered drug money, leaving Oliver on the run from the drug cartels, a crooked cop, and, last but by no means least, a reality TV show producer…

A Cup of Pending offers sun, sand, and supermodels in an entertaining combination of unlikely events. With the series of coincidences going off like a string of firecrackers, this well-written thriller is amusing and entertaining by turns, guaranteed to keep you turning pages. The characters are complex and unique, definitely one of the strengths of the story, and the reality show theme carries over well into the storyline. Author Jonah Gibson picked a good plotline to showcase his light-hearted, fast-paced style, making the book eminently readable. I’d recommend this to anyone needing a good beach read—or a glimpse of the Tropics to pick them out of the mid-winter doldrums.