Mr. November, Matt Hogan

Mr. November, Matt Hogan

Mr. November

Samuel Webb is a time-traveller, altering the past investment by investment for his company. In the mutable present, he lives in a shrinking oasis of luxury, with every need catered to almost before he voices it, and his main source of companionship his downstairs bartender. However, when people from his past begin to vanish from the present, Webb begins to look under the shiny surface of his life, without the insulating layer of alcohol, and what he finds forces him to act – but is there any way that he can salvage the past he remembers from the present his actions have created?

Mr. November offers some interesting ideas for contemplation – what if one company were able to travel through time, and invest with knowledge of the greatest booms and busts of the future? With a plot underlaid by time-travel paradoxes and a concept of how each of those small changes to the past could impact the future, the story shows the care that went into the plotting. I did feel that the plot was let down to a degree by some of the technical aspects of the writing, which occasionally side-tracked me from the read, but overall this book was definitely worth-while, with some nice inter-personal dynamics.

Peace Warriors of the Galaxy: Journey to Lyrica, Tessie Jayme

Peace Warriors of the Galaxy: Journey to Lyrica, Tessie Jayme

Peace Warriors of the Galaxy: Journey to Lyrica

The epic science-fiction, Peace Warriors of the Galaxy: Journey to Lyrica, by Tessie Jayme, is set in a future where an institution known as the Special Abilities Training Institute explores extraordinary mental abilities of all kinds from telepathy to eidetic memory, and where Earth has made contact and treaties with a planet named Lyrica, home to a race of powerfully telepathic beings. Dwylla and Brig-Aaron, attending a SATI recruitment trial, are picked up immediately for training. Neither they, nor their recruiters, suspect that before they’ve even completely finished their training, they will be part of a team picked to journey covertly to Lyrica to join the Earth Embassy there.

Peace Warriors of the Galaxy: Journey to Lyrica explores an unusual slant on the sci-fi staple of psionic abilities, where Dwylla’s ability to block another’s telepathy is one of the rarest talents. This book is very clearly the first book in a series, with a number of romantic and plot arcs opened, but where the resolutions for almost all of them are held for the second or even the third book. I did feel that the Ryndell character was damaged somewhat by his transformation into the kind of martinet leader who sets edicts, disobeys them, and then demands obeisance from his inferiors. Overall, I found the story to be a pleasant read, although the pacing was impacted by the sheer volume of adjectives that embroidered the many of the descriptions of persons and scenes. The development of Lyrica and the Lyricans also added some interesting touches.

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Jungle Eyes, Lindsay Marie Miller

Jungle Eyes, Lindsay Marie Miller

Jungle Eyes (Stranded in Paradise Book 1)

Set in the spring of 1899, Lindsay Marie Miller’s Jungle Eyes introduces us to Mr. Henry Rochester of New York, descendant of royalty and eligible bachelor, whose mother is unrelentingly anxious that he should make a good match. In desperation, Henry signs on for an exploratory voyage into the Atlantic, timed to get him safely out of reach of all good matches for at least nine months. However, as voyages of exploration tend to, the voyage took an unexpected turn, and Mr. Rochester finds himself stranded on a tropical island, wholly dependent on a beautiful castaway for care of his injuries. However, their survival hangs by a thread…

Jungle Eyes is a solid period romance, a little flexible on geography but studded with beautifully set cameo locales and close-ups of our hero and heroine. Written with a good feel for dialogue, the main focus is on Henry Rochester, and the tempestuously chaotic attraction that springs to life between him and his island rescuer, Elaine Carmichael. Lindsay Marie Miller creates an unusual, antagonistic atmosphere between the two, which remains remarkably consistent right through to the close of the book. With exotic locations, pirates, treasure caves and hurricanes, this book has something to offer to a range of readers.

End of a Girl, Nia Sinjorina

End of a Girl, Nia Sinjorina

End of a Girl (Folio 55 Book 1)

Nia Sinjorina’s End of a Girl is the story of a teenage Molly Peterson, at school in an English comprehensive that she hates, told alternately from her own diaries and the point of view of one of her acolytes, tasked to write her history in the last days before Earth’s defeat. Molly, the class misfit, finds herself unexpectedly developing powers beyond her understanding; powers to destroy, but also powers to communicate…and powers to raise the dead. As the incidents become more public, Molly finds herself teetering on the edge of exposure, with not one, but two, covert organisations desperate to get their hands on her.

End of a Girl offers a story written from two very different viewpoints; one from the perspective and in the dialect of an English teen, and the other from the point of view of an acolyte who has passed beyond the use of language to communicate, and whose writing style is dense, obscured by the attempt to fit full-spectrum mental communication into marks on a page. While the container of the story is distinctive and well-done, the high level of the language may discourage some readers from giving the book the attention it deserves. Certainly an interesting and unique take on the genre.

Trojan Nefra Contact, Brian Dingle

Trojan Nefra Contact, Brian Dingle

Trojan: Nefra Contact (Trojan Series Book 2)

Brian Henry Dingle’s Trojan: Nefra Contact is a first contact story with a twist, between a pair of Nefra convicts and a UNSA team exploring a very new moon that appeared out of nowhere in Jupiter orbit. Mer, a Nefra whose intellect and desire to learn are in direct conflict with the worker class he was born into, has been imprisoned and sentenced to death by hard labour along with his friend Elper, far from the planet of his origin, for having exhibited the ability to read. Major James Edward Garth, of the UNSA, is about to have an unusual experience with the Law of Gravity, and these events will completely alter both their lives.

Trojan: Nefra Contact is a well-conceived science-fiction / adventure story, featuring some unique characters and strong plot twists. In some areas, the author’s depth of research on the scientific aspects has a tendency to take over the storyline, but overall, the story holds together despite the point of view slips into the omniscient. The suspense and action are well-paced, and the interaction between the characters offers welcome leavening to the book, along with well-set descriptions of space and the basic mechanics of moving and working in a space suit. Definitely a good read for readers of science-fiction or adventure.