End of a Girl, Nia Sinjorina

End of a Girl, Nia Sinjorina

End of a Girl (Folio 55 Book 1)

Nia Sinjorina’s End of a Girl is the story of a teenage Molly Peterson, at school in an English comprehensive that she hates, told alternately from her own diaries and the point of view of one of her acolytes, tasked to write her history in the last days before Earth’s defeat. Molly, the class misfit, finds herself unexpectedly developing powers beyond her understanding; powers to destroy, but also powers to communicate…and powers to raise the dead. As the incidents become more public, Molly finds herself teetering on the edge of exposure, with not one, but two, covert organisations desperate to get their hands on her.

End of a Girl offers a story written from two very different viewpoints; one from the perspective and in the dialect of an English teen, and the other from the point of view of an acolyte who has passed beyond the use of language to communicate, and whose writing style is dense, obscured by the attempt to fit full-spectrum mental communication into marks on a page. While the container of the story is distinctive and well-done, the high level of the language may discourage some readers from giving the book the attention it deserves. Certainly an interesting and unique take on the genre.

Trojan Nefra Contact, Brian Dingle

Trojan Nefra Contact, Brian Dingle

Trojan: Nefra Contact (Trojan Series Book 2)

Brian Henry Dingle’s Trojan: Nefra Contact is a first contact story with a twist, between a pair of Nefra convicts and a UNSA team exploring a very new moon that appeared out of nowhere in Jupiter orbit. Mer, a Nefra whose intellect and desire to learn are in direct conflict with the worker class he was born into, has been imprisoned and sentenced to death by hard labour along with his friend Elper, far from the planet of his origin, for having exhibited the ability to read. Major James Edward Garth, of the UNSA, is about to have an unusual experience with the Law of Gravity, and these events will completely alter both their lives.

Trojan: Nefra Contact is a well-conceived science-fiction / adventure story, featuring some unique characters and strong plot twists. In some areas, the author’s depth of research on the scientific aspects has a tendency to take over the storyline, but overall, the story holds together despite the point of view slips into the omniscient. The suspense and action are well-paced, and the interaction between the characters offers welcome leavening to the book, along with well-set descriptions of space and the basic mechanics of moving and working in a space suit. Definitely a good read for readers of science-fiction or adventure.

Run from the Stars, R Billing

Run from the Stars, R Billing

Run from the Stars (The Arcturian Confederation Book 1)

The Arcturians are the only space fleet in human space with faster-than-light drive; the conduit through which all interstellar commerce and travellers must flow. Following a kidnap attempt that she successfully derailed, Jane Gould was recruited by the Arcturians, and she’s never looked back; the Space Fleet is her life. However, an old feud is heating up between planets, and when Jane goes undercover, things get complicated fast.

Run from the Stars is an explosion-filled, think-on-your feet read, with a protagonist who looks about as dangerous as a candyfloss cone and uses that appearance to kick a lot of ass. Jane is one of those absolutely non-stereotypical heroines who will make you breathe a sigh of relief – she rarely needs rescuing, she’s a top-rank pilot, she can shoot straight, and she doesn’t do gooey. I felt that some of the secondary characters could have been fleshed out a little more, and sometimes the explanations run a little long, but by and large this was a highly enjoyable read. R. Billing’s writing is action-packed and technically sound, with enough tech to make it fun but not enough to mire the pace of the story in technobabble. Definitely one to recommend to any sci-fi fans on the hunt for their next book.

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Paradise, Michael R Watson

Paradise, Michael R Watson

Paradise (Aftershock Series Book 1)

The setting of Paradise, using earthquakes as the vehicle of the disaster, provides an interesting and plausible twist on the story. It leads neatly into the classic dystopia breakdown of infrastructure and mass civilisation, and the rise of local power structures, of which this book offers a number. The roaming Raiders, the feudal system of the Tent City, the religious enclave, and the survivalist hermits hacking it on their own all add to the backdrop of the plot.

There were, however, aspects of the writing that I found impacted the read, including technical challenges in grammar and spelling that were continuous enough to keep pulling me out of the story. In addition, the point of view, which stayed steady on one character, first person, for the first two-thirds of the book, began to move around in the later stages of the book, including switches into third person, which was a trifle jarring.

There was also only one true antagonist, the Governor of the Tent City. The religious enclave was open-minded and accepting, at least provided the women made all the meals, the raiders were actually working the Robin Hood angle underneath the bad reputations, and even the leader of the brutal encampment guards turned out to be nothing more objectionable than a good old boy. Despite the dystopia setting, things never really got rough, which I found made it difficult for me to keep my disbelief suspended through the plot.

In short, I felt that the book had a good initial idea, but it didn’t quite manage to pull me in and convince me over the long run.

Prophecy, Petra Landon

Prophecy, Petra Landon

The Prophecy (Saga of the Chosen Book 1)

Tasia has just, finally, made a place for herself, off everyone’s radar in San Francisco. She’s got two low-level jobs and an apartment in a crappy part of town. She’s registered as about the lowest level of magic user that can still work, and so far, no one’s asking inconvenient questions – up until a side-gig cleaning magical residue leads her to do the powerful Shifter clans a favour. That leads Tasia into a series of events that bring her into more and more danger of blowing her cover – and an increasingly tangled relationship with the enigmatic Alpha Protector.

The Prophecy is an entertaining blend of urban fantasy and paranormal romance, set in a San Francisco where the magical community lives side by side with normal humans, keeping their differences hidden by whatever means necessary. I felt that more clarity around exactly why Tasia was attempting to hide, and from whom, would have strengthened the story; in hiding because bad things was really the plot summary I walked away with on that score. Some of the character reactions also came across as inconsistent, which is a shame as the story is complex and well-paced, and offers a number of points of interest to the reader. I really feel with a little more polishing and character development this could easily make a five-star review. Fans of urban fantasy, and especially those who enjoy a spunky but submissive protagonist, will definitely find this an enjoyable read.